by Jargon Writer

Writing my way to becoming a freelancer

Weekly Link Round Up

How to Succeed in Business Without Knowing Very Much. – “I can rework the same paragraph 15 times and would never consider the first 14 “wrong” — just unsatisfying, or awkward, unmusical or unclear. I explore etymologies, refer to the O.E.D., rewrite, read anything I can about the topic at hand, take tangents while on a tangent.” I think that quote speaks for itself. Check out the rest of the post.

The Best Freelance Advice I’ve Ever Been Given – Marian, with her typical style, has infiltrated the ranks of freelancers and editors everywhere. But, fortunately for us, she decided to share some of what she found out. Great advice, and a must read if you want to be serious about writing.

Are You Just a Freelancer? Or a Successful One? This post, whose discovery was completely an accident, breaks down into numbers and incorporates in one post many of the things I’ve been trying to communicate throughout the time I’ve been writing this blog. It defines the difference between freelancing and BEING a freelancer. If you’re looking to make the shift, as I am, you had better know each of the things on this list.

How to Use Metaphors in Copywriting – Tom, who was recently kind enough to guest post for y’all, here on my humble blog, explains the difference between Liquid Engineering and a Leaky Umbrella – by which I mean a good metaphor and one that fails miserably. In his post he explains the difference between these two metaphors and why one works and the other … if full of holes (yeah, I did it, I went there, I was pun-ny).

Have You Seen This Dog? – Tell me, after reading Tom’s post above if you feel this is a perfect example of a leaky umbrella or of liquid engineering? It’s a post that touched home for me, which is why I am sharing it; I feel the sentiment it conveys is one all freelancers will know and recognize. At its essence, it is about the difference between our creative side and our business side and the need to keep the two separate but to nurture both, while understanding that the two have very different needs.

Teaching J-Students About Irony – An ironic post about irony. This post at We the Bistro made me smile. It spoke to the contradictory nature of writers and how rarely we remember to apply what we preach. Even those of us, like me, who write about how to do what we do well sometimes needed to be reminded to do more than talk about it. This piece did that.

Kicking Around a New Sales Strategy – With yesterday’s discussion of positioning fresh in mind, I couldn’t leave this post off the list even though it makes the list one longer than normal. While not from a freelancing perspective, it discusses in a way that is both frank and helpful the trouble with defining your target client base and the struggle one small business owner has had with it. The New York Times Small Business blog is one I read regularly. It is written by a number of small business owners who take turns authoring posts about their various businesses. Since they are essentially my target audience, I read it both for the small business advice and to learn more about my audience – but I think many of you can likely learn from it as well and I highly recommend it.

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March 31, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized

2 Comments »

  1. The link “Are You Just a Freelancer?” is A-M-A-Z-I-N-G. Thanks so much for sharing!

    Comment by Marian Schembari | March 31, 2010 | Reply

    • Glad you enjoyed it!

      Comment by mbreau | March 31, 2010 | Reply


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